Week 1




1    8/27    Introductory exercise. Discussion of course syllabus.
                Bring to class: sheets of yellow paper and exercises; 11x17 sheet for seating chart; syllabi; Origin; "Beagle Diary."
                Distribute Beagle extracts: Read/discuss what kind of person was CD?
                What possible research topics emerge from this extract?
                Distribute Origin extracts: Read/discuss the major points that jump out at you.
                Homework : summarize this selection for Wed.
                Walk through the syllabus, with emphasis on the research process and goals.
                Homework: read CD's intro and chap 14 in Origin for Wed. and be ready to summarize in class.



2    8/29    Introductory exercise. Origin, Darwin's Introduction (pp. 1-6) and chapter 14.
                Bring to class: sheets of yellow paper for exercises; seating chart; syllabi; Origin; "Beagle Diary"; Descent and the extract; Mr. Darwin's Shooter. [?? find the Social Studies cert. Goals and connect to writing]
                Syllabus - questions? The independent study extra credit as an alternative to the HO/EC option (albeit somewhat more expanded expectations on paper length).
                CD's Origin: using S reading worksheets prepared at home, what are the major point(s) in your summaries?
                Any questions about preparing an S worksheet sheet?
                Discuss your summaries in basic groups class discussion/conclusions
               Origin intro: chronology for writing the book, and the methodology he used; Origin as an Abstract for a larger work (became the rest of his publications); device ("a naturalist . . . might come to the conclusion") for countering opposing notions such as special creation, adaptation to external conditions, Lamarckian volition; two favorite examples (woodpecker - intricate structural adaptation; misseltoe - parasite and co-adaptation); contents SoA for book; CD's thesis.
                Recap and summary: [keep in mind that there was no general understanding of genetics at this time-blending inheritance ruled]; sexual selection (468); varieties as incipient species (469); "slow steps" evolution (471); "theory of descent with modification" (476); use and disuse (479); time-span of the world (481); "one primordial form, into which life was first breathed" (484); optimistic outlook, but inadvertent contribution to what will become social Darwinism/eugenics (489); the concluding "laws."
                Homework: use intro and recap/summary chapter SoA for Natural Selection + CD's thesis.
                2nd Introductory exercise: re-familiarize themselves with the "Beagle Diary" extract, then distribute Descent extracts: Read/discuss the major points that jump out at you.
                Set up next meeting: read for CD's thesis and SoA, which we'll then develop together in class.


Week 2

9/3    Labor Day holiday - no class.

3    9/5    Introductory exercise. Descent, Darwin's Introduction (pp. 1-5) and chapter 21 (in part 2).
                Bring to class: sheets of yellow paper for exercises; seating chart; syllabi; Origin; Descent.
                Review three reading worksheets introduced to date: S, SoA, and TC; and the writing exercise, TS.
                Discuss Homework: Origin intro and recap/summary chapter SoA for Natural Selection + CD's thesis. Need to understand the notion behind these two exercises, as well as having a handle on Darwin's argument in advance of scanning selected chapters for research topics.
                offer a range of potential topics and review the TC worksheet.
                Discuss Descent:
                CD's Intro - why he's emboldened to extend the subtle allusion to mankind in Origin into a full essay, but the danger of looking at one species in isolation. Purpose and assumption (2-3); Lamarck; current writers on same theme (building on the Origin), and endorsement of Haeckel.
                Chapter 21 - main conclusion (385), and only savage-like intellects still accept creation explanation (386); SoA for why mankind fits descent by modification via nat sel (387); [the weakness in CD's argument - he has no mechanism to explain modifications and their continuance in progeny, so must rely on "laws of inheritance," use and disuse of parts, and sexual selection] morality (390f); sexual vs. natural selection (398-99); CD's contribution to Social Darwinism and eugenics (403f).
                Homework for next meeting: Scan/read Origin, chapters 1-4 (everyone); TC for two or more potential topics for next meeting, such as race; civilized vs. uncivilized; domestic (artificial) selection; island ecosystems; the geological record; creationism.
                Basic groups (S/SoA): 6 (Amanda, Erik, Jim, Bryan N); 9 (Bryan G, Robin, Charlie, Erin); 10 Heather, Garrett, Brett); 11 (Carl, Don, Pete, Molly).


Week 3




4    9/10    Homework for this meeting: Scan/read Origin, chapters 1-4 (everyone);
                TC for two or more potential topics for next meeting, such as race; civilized vs. uncivilized; domestic (artificial) selection; island ecosystems; the geological record; creationism.
                Basic groups (S/SoA): 6 (Amanda, Erik, Jim, Bryan N); 9 (Bryan G, Robin, Charlie, Erin); 10 (Heather, Garrett, Brett); 11 (Carl, Don, Pete, Molly).
                Seating: in the basic groups for homework assignment.
                Return SoA on Darwin's argument from intro and summation, with comments - schematic; amount of detail necessary to reconstruct argument later; how comprehensive should it be? Will discuss the TS another time.
                General class discussion of potential topics (and the TC) for chaps. 1-4.
                - what's a realistic, potential research topic?
                - how keep track of them at this stage, during the run-up to the prospectus.
                - discuss what the prospectus should contain.
                Basic groups discuss summations in respective chapters supplement list of potential topics
                present to whole class.
                Possible topics under consideration:
                - extinction - creationism
                - the geological record - climate/environment species dispersal
                - species as a concept - civilized/uncivilized peoples (anthropology)
                - island ecosystems - CD's use of science to justify social values
                - variation under domestication
                - inheritance (including use/disuse)
                - race (equal/unequal; species/varieties)
                Give out new basic group assignments:
                Homework: Scan/read Descent, chapters 1, 4, 7, 8 (everyone); one person in each basic group is responsible for chaps. 3, 5, 6, 19, 20 (note addition of chapter 5).
                Compile TC for own topic in common chapters; in the basic group chapter, write a TC for own topic + one that is not yours.


Week 3

5    9/12    Homework: Scan/read Descent, chapters 1, 4, 7, 8 (everyone); one person in each basic group is responsible for chaps. 3, 5, 6, 19, 20 (note addition of chapter 5).
                Compile TC for own topic in common chapters; in the basic group chapter, write a TC for own topic + one that is not yours.
                The terrorist attack on the WTC Tuesday required an alteration in the schedule. PV-J began by stating his views about how those of us not immediately affected by the attack ought to respond in the coming days. Then there was an exchange of views, after which we proceeded with a discussion of the research prospectus and listened to about half the class talk about their #1 research topic at the moment. The nine people who presented noted the following general topics (each may undertake a variation):
                Creationism: Don
                Amanda
                Bryan G.
                Race: Erik,
                Jim
                Geological Record: Charlie
                Robin
                Selection (domes/nat): Bryan N
                Inheritance/ecosystems: Brett
                Homework: distributed handout on accessing the Diary on the HST 803 web site, and the dates covered by the pages assigned in the Keynes edition (still unavailable at SBS).


Week 4

6    9/17    Scan/read "Diary," 3-51, 120-44, 221-28 (revised for the HST 803 web site).
                Reminder: Prospectus due in V-J's box in 301 Morrill Hall (History Department) by 11:55 a.m. on 9/21 this Friday).
                Continue presentation of individual research topics, including any rethinking since last meeting (updated):
                Creationism: Don
                Amanda
                Bryan G
                Race (includes civilized/uncivilized; mental and cultural differences):
                Erik
                Jim
                Erin
                Heather
                Garrett?
                Geological Record: Charlie (overlap between geology/NatH)
                Robin
                Selection (domes/nat): Bryan N
                Carl
                Inheritance/ecosystems: Brett
                Molly (use/disuse)
                Pete (islands)
                restructure the class in temporary research groups by contiguous topics; begin formulating the paragraph justification of the topic and exchange ideas about promising evidence.
                Homework: continue the scan/reading for topics/evidence, according to the handout.



7    9/19    Scan/read "Diary," 249-64, 295-304, 351-80, 413-18 (revised for web site, too)
                Catch-up from last week: Scan/read Descent, chapters 1, 4, 7, 8 (everyone); one person in each basic group is responsible for chaps. 3, 5, 6, 19, 20 (note addition of chapter 5).
                Compile TC for own topic in common chapters; in the basic group chapter, write a TC for own topic + one that is not yours.
                Begin in temporary research groups by contiguous topics, based on above grouping.
                discuss themes/evidence found in "Diary" scan on your topics clarify justification (revise rough draft of this part of the prospectus).
                clarify topic description temporary research groups by contiguous topics (revise rough draft of this part of the prospectus).
                Shift to basic groups, where each person gives a short presentation on the proposed research topic and a general overview of what parts of the "Diary" and Origin and/or Descent are likely to be the first concentrated research areas.
                Homework for Monday: Ruse, prologue ( S: What Qs does he ask? Meaning of Darwinian Revolution? Recurring themes?) and chapter 1 (SoA covering the idea, Lamarck, and Cuvier sections).


Week 5

8    9/24    Hand in Ruse worksheet for chapter 1 (SoA covering the idea, Lamarck, and Cuvier sections). Retain prologue ( S: What Qs does he ask? Meaning of Darwinian Revolution? Recurring themes?)
                Delay presentations of final research topics in research groups.
                Basic Groups: Return prospectus, noting that many have a - minus to resolve before proceeding with research topic.
                10 minute Quick-write exercise: (1) schematic SoA that shows From To segments of proposed topic; (2) initial line of research (what limited Q will guide your reading/search for evidence in developing the "To" part of your argument?)
                Must have thematic continuity, so that you can compare CD's thinking/writing about the topic (eg., not creation evolution, but creationism critique of creationism; or fixity of species on voyage varieties as incipient species; centers of creation descent with modification via dispersal porcesses). Must be sufficiently limited: eg., one mechanism of selection such as use/disuse, or from assumption about inheritance laws of variation (esp in Origin).
                Discuss SoA and initial lines of research. Then hand in the Quick writes so I can set up research shuffle groups for the "To" phase.
                Only began to discuss Ruse's prologue; basic groups seminar.
                Homework: Ruse, chapter 6 - S worksheet with brief summation of main points in each section.
               Origin: 43 (summary of chap 1); 58-59 (summary of chap 2); chaps 3 & 4; 167-70 (summary of chap 5); chap 6. Discussion facilitators: chap 3 (BG1), chap 4 (BG2), chap 6 (BG3).



9    9/26    Ruse, chapter 6; Origin (chapters assigned)
                Group folders: take out marked SoA and put in Ruse, chap 6 worksheets. Reminder about keeping a processfolio and bringing it to office hours.
                Discussion of Ruse, prologue and chapter 1.
                SoAs for chapter 1 were generally moving in direction I'm looking for in this exercise - schematic format, covering each section; inconsistencies in amount of detail necessary to reconstruct the author's argument, whether when we first discuss it or later on if you need to consult it during research/writing.
               Origin: 43 (summary of chap 1); 58-59 (summary of chap 2); chaps 3 & 4; 167-70 (summary of chap 5); chap 6. Discussion facilitators: chap 3 (BG1), chap 4 (BG2), chap 6 (BG3).
                - clarify purposes: (1) to understand CD's argument/theory as a whole in which to situate your individual topic; (2) to extract specific evidence bearing on your topic.
                - how to use the chapter summations/conclusions in CD's books.
                - group facilitators lead discussion of assigned chapters.
                Begin phase two of research process:
                - review blue topic/preliminary hypothesis sheets; please return to me.
                - set up the writing logs: title page with topic. Then to double-sided format: source pages (set aside four right-hand pages); hypothesis page, with overview of lines of research (set aside three right-hand pages for this); initial line of research on top of left pages/daily log on right page (as set forth in syllabus, p.4).
                - dos and don'ts when taking research notes: short titles/contractions for sources in upper left; subject in upper right (eg., To - laws of variation); either quote or summary in your own words -- avoid paraphrases at all costs; [bracketed responses]
                Homework: Desmond and Moore not available at this time; will delay to later in semester.
                Ruse, chap 7: this is critical; do another S worksheet by sections.
               Origin: rest of book, taking notes (combination of TC and research notes - bring both to class for me to review. Everyone read chap 16, the recap/conclusion, with care - for CD's argument and for relevance to your own topic.
                Next meeting: students assigned to research shuffle groups for "To" phase.


Week 6

10    10/1    Due: Ruse, chapter 7 (S worksheet - section synopses). Origin (chapters relevant to topic).
                    Problems with Ruse worksheets outlined - to much "that" he said something, not enough "what" he said. Not necessarily a matter of adding more lines but rethinking what is written.
                    Walked through the parts of the research log and notecards.
                    Presentations on Origin, chaps 3 & 4.
                    Homework: Ruse chapter 9 (section synopses). Continue with topic search in DoM - make notecards, etc.


11    10/3    Due: Ruse, chapter 9 -- section summaries.
                    Set forth expectations for the "To" draft due end of next week:
                    Overview of Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection
                    situate topic within this overview
                    substantiate with quotations + explanation drawing on Ruse.
                    Finish presentations on Origin: chap 6 and 16
                    Research shuffle groups by contiguous topics discuss current research status in Origin/Descent.
                    Homework: Ruse, chapter 3 (section summaries).


Week 7

12    10/8    Due: Ruse, chapter 3 (section summaries).
                    Stocktaking on research process - log, note-cards, drafting the "To" section due on Friday.
                    hand in sample of note-card
                    Review expectations for "To" draft, including use of brackets as self-reflective comments about what might be done next at this stage.
                    Walk through Ruse chapters, sorting out questions necessary to explain Darwin for research topics.
                    - vera causae in chap3; Spencer and natural theology (design & morphology) in chap 6.
                    Homework: Browne, Intro - chapter 3: no worksheets required, but take notes for your research topic and come with list of questions.
                    facilitation by basic groups.
                    Bring draft of "To" section in current state for discussion.



13    10/10    Browne, Intro - chapter 3: no worksheets required, but take notes for your research topic and come with list of questions.
                    facilitation by basic groups.
                    Note-taking: - be sure the context of a quotation is clear. For example, "his" needs a bracket of explanation.
                    - subject heading in upper right corner: the tighter/specific from outset, the better.
                    Discussion of Ruse chapters:
                    chap 3: - catastrophism vs. Lyell's three principles/CD's shift from Sedgwick to Lyell
                    - CD's coral reef theory as example of out-Lyellian Lyell (and sets up species Q)
                    - Herschel's vera causae vs. Whewell's consilience.
                    - Meaning of Revealed Religion in this context.
                    chap 6: - requirement for a natural law broadened to include statistical correlation/approximation
                    chap 7: - reading Erasmus Darwin: influence vs. familiarity
                    - Lyell in more detail, esp. on adaptation and species, and how CD shifts his thinking in 1837 toward evolution and natural selection while remaining Lyellian geologist. "Coral of life"(168) metaphor, etc. The steps in CD developing new theory.
                    - how Malthus and Herschel become central to CD
                    - human origins explainable by natural law/vestiges of design argument
                    - analysis of Origin by chapters
                    chap 9: - why CD's theory is not Newtonian.
                    -- implication of Origin for criticism of religion swamped by Higher Criticism
                    - context for DoM: Lyell's Antiquity of Man, Wallace's spiritualism.
                    - Design in the 1860s (context for the "To" section for some, not just CD's early views)
                    Browne: intro (the historical question/lit review/thesis for book (and sets up a rough F T)
                    - look for the psychologizing and speculations masquerading as facts.
                    chap 1: (bring map of England) clarify Georgian and Regency/gentry/garden and hothouse at The Mount/amorphous boundary between rural and small urban/relationship with father (18)/chronic ill health in Wedgewoods-mother's death when CD was 8/the sisterhood (21)/contingent event - boarding at Shrewsbury School & the chemistry lab of Bones and Gas.
                    chap 2: medicine at Edinburgh with Erasmus in 1825 (who had already finished Cambridge). Long beginning on Erasmus and Robert Darwin.

*** 10/12 Draft of "To" section due in V-J's box in 301 Morrill Hall by 11:55 a.m.

                    Homework for next week: (take notes for your research topic, whether in worksheet or note-card form)
14    10/15    Browne, chapters 3-6.
                    Ruse, chapter 2.

15    10/17    Browne, chapters 7-8; parallel readings in "Diary."


Week 8

14    10/15    Mid-semester date.
                    Due: Browne, chapters 4-6; Ruse, chapter 2.
                    Continue with Basic Group facilitation of chapters 2 and 3 in Browne; in addition to an overview of the contents and what we find out about Darwin as a person and emerging scientist, are there any incidents that could be interpreted as contingent events?
                    Basic group exercise: discuss a sequential logic of CD's argument for evolution by natural selection
                    each person write up in own words on blue sheet.
                    hand in for me to review
                    Marked "To" drafts will be available outside my office by 4:00 tomorrow (Tuesday). Please pick up and look over before class on Wednesday.
                    Homework for next meeting: Browne, chapters 7-8; parallel readings in "Diary." Hand in research notes/TC that you develop on Browne and "Diary."
                    - Hacker on clause (207), independent clause (209), subordinate clause (213) vs. phrase (211).
                    Bring Hacker and writing logs to class.



15    10/17    Due: Browne, chapters 7-8; parallel readings in "Diary." (Hand in TC/research notes)
                    Comments on the marked "To" papers. Most were incomplete in setting up the thesis paragraph. First, complete the in-class worksheet on CD's logic for "descent by modification" (evolution and mechanisms).
                   Origin: nature "selects" (83); logic of argument (127-29; 459).
                    basis for intro to a revised thesis paragraph for the "To" section.
                    transition to own topic (define it and show connections to CD's overall theory)
                    CD's position on this topic by 1859/71 (the thesis statement for this portion).
                    - creation theory/design purpose (133).
                    - "conditions of life" = Lamarck??? (133-39)
                    - acclimatisation (139-43) and possible implications for humans?
                    - geographical distribution (476) and humans?
                    - variability (466-67)
                    - islands and migration from mainland (477-78)
                    Hacker: clauses (207), independent clauses (209), subordinate clauses (213) vs. phrases (211).
                    Browne, chaps 4-6: what are highlights of Browne's interpretation of Darwin as a person and emerging scientist? Did you find incidents that are potentially useful as contingent events for your topic?
                    how are you keeping track of biographical material that you may use for your research essay?
                    Homework: Hacker: proper use and citation of quotations for subsequent drafts.
                    - Browne, chapters 9-10; parallel readings in "Diary." Hand in research notes/TC that you develop on Browne and "Diary."


Week 9

16    10/22    Due: Browne, chapters 9-10; parallel readings in “Diary.”
                    Research groups to discuss potential evidence in Browne, chs 7-8 and parallel “Diary” readings.
                     ? emerging patterns + refinement of topic, if necessary.
                     ? Class discussion of the person/naturalist CD was at the outset of the voyage and patterns of
     continuity and change in first six months of voyage.



17    10/24    Due today: Browne, chapters 11-12; parallel readings in “Diary” (hand in one sample of research note/TC/SoA for both Browne and Diary)
                    Hacker: summations and paraphrases (173-74); integrating quotations (174-78), but note exception for
the parenthetical references.
                    Stocktaking of topic and where you are in the research/writing process, keeping in mind following due
dates:

18        10/29     Browne, chapters 13-14; parallel readings in “Diary.”

19        10/31     First-draft writing workshop.

***        11/2    Complete first draft of research paper due in V-J’s box in 301 Morrill Hall by 11:55 a.m.

                        ? expectations for format and quality of first draft.
                        Browne: highlights of Browne’s interpretation of Darwin as a person and emerging scientist? Did you find incidents that are potentially useful as contingent events for your topic?
                        ? how are you keeping track of biographical material that you may use for your research essay?
                       ? how use Browne to inform/help explain & interpret evidence in the “Diary”-- but your argument should feature the  “Diary” and use Browne in a subsidiary manner, not the reverse.
                    For Monday 10/29, in addition to reading assignment, bring in all research materials from Browne and
Diary, organized in the manner you intend to follow in developing your argument for this section and a
working draft of your mini-thesis for the “From” section.
 
 


Week 10

18    10/29    Due: Browne, chapters 13-14; parallel readings in “Diary.” in addition to reading assignment, bring in all research materials from Browne and Diary, organized in the manner you intend to follow in developing your argument for this section and a working draft of your mini-thesis for the “From” section.

Distribute and review the guidelines for the research paper.

        Used Browne, ch 7, to work through several dos and don’ts when writing history:
                 1. p. 173–opinion vs. fact speculation. Instead use perhaps, etc.

                 2. p. 176–asking why something did not happen can be an effective strategy.

                 3. pp. 183-86–St. Jago as contingent event for some topics, but not for others.

                 4. p. 186–Browne’s thesis that Lyell was central to CD’s thinking on the Beagle.
                                                                                           --how cf. Ruse?

                 5. p. 186–classic mistaken historical reasoning, where a possibility is transmuted into fact.

                 6. The Whig interpretation of history.
 

                    Prepare a 5-minute presentation for Wednesday that covers the intro expectations
                    lit review-- topic-- historical question-- thesis statement



19    10/31    First-draft writing workshop.

In Basic Groups: 5-minute presentations on the introduction to the first draft:
                  lit review-- topic-- historical question-- thesis statement
         followed by peer review and suggestions.

General discussion of introductions and remainder of research paper.

Signed up for individual half-hour appointments with PV-J to discuss first drafts.

Distributed class-copies of sample articles. Read one for Monday, when we will discuss how to read and use articles in your research.

Did not have time to discuss comma splices (Hacker).

This Friday: Complete first draft of research paper due in V-J’s box in 301 Morrill Hall by 11:55 a.m.

Monday: Bring copies of introductions to each member in your basic group.
 Browne, chapters 15-16


Week 11
20   11/5 Due: Distribute copy of first draft introduction to each member of your basic group. Browne, chapters 15-16.

Reminder about appointment times–please be on time since I cannot exceed the half-hour slot you
selected.

Some delayed style issues. Use back of Writing Log for following exercises.
                 –add to checklist that Beagle should be underlined, and full designation is H. M. S. Beagle.
                 –dangling modifiers: Hacker, 12-13, for examples. For Wednesday, rework following sentences:

                         Reaching the heart, a bypass was performed on the severely blocked arteries. [corrected in class]

                         To acquire a degree in almost any field, two science courses must be completed. [rework as homework]

          –run-on sentence with comma splice: Hacker, 45-47, for examples. For Wednesday, rework following sentence:

                    Proper documentation must accompany claims for reimbursement, however a paid receipt is not necessarily required.

Reminder about expectations for the Writing Log, as set forth on the mid-semester review form.
               Source pages: entry for CD’s “Diary” should be “Beagle Diary.” Add entry for one article you checked out, following format in Hacker. [add synopsis of argument/thesis, and comment on extent of usefulness for your research. Could documentation/bibliography lead you to other possible sources?]
              Hypothesis page is often incomplete.
              Double-entry format often incomplete. Right side frequently missing time spent; need to rethink time spent writing and find the most productive length and spacing during each week.
              Left side often not used for stock-taking as outgrowth of reflections, or proposing subsequent lines of research.

Browne, chs. 15-16. Basic Groups: What were critical steps/contingent developments in CD’s thinking about the “question of questions” in the years immediately after his return from the voyage.
        --class discussion.
                --Homework: which steps/developments apply to your research topic?
                                            --discuss in Research Groups on Wednesday
 

Homework: (1) review classmates’ introductions. Mark them up for practice, as if you were the instructor, adding your name as reviewer to the top of the first page. Each student revise own introduction and bring copy to class on Wednesday. (2) Read secondary way packet, then write a thematic outline of general trends in Darwin studies that would serve as the basis for your lit review section of the introduction (final draft). (3) Bring to class your Writing Log, properly updated and fitting expectations; revise the hypothesis page; next line of research should either be on that page or left-side entry. (4) Bring organized process-folios to class.



21    11/7 See homework assignments on 11/5 daily log.

Sit in basic groups.

Discuss thematic lit. review outline prepared after reading the secondary way packet
            --review purpose of the review of scholarly literature in any research paper
                        -- move from selected general trends/themes-- description/definition of your topic and the state of the scholarly literature on that topic
                                    --statement of your task and the historical question that guided research
                                                            --thesis statement of your findings

Peer review of introductions submitted in the first draft: the person reviewed should listen to all comments without reactions (take notes); then reply to criticism in terms of what you’ve incorporated so far, what you had not considered but may incorporate, and what you are not inclined to incorporate at this time.

                    --give marked intros to the person reviewed (but should be returned next Wednesday)

             –general discussion of intros
                    --I’ll accept revised intros next Wednesday for individual review

             – thematic outline of intros.

Hacker exercises:

                    To acquire a degree in almost any field, two science courses must be completed.

          –run-on sentence with comma splice: Hacker, 45-47, for examples. For Wednesday, rework
     following sentence:

                    Proper documentation must accompany claims for reimbursement, however a paid  receipt is not necessarily required.

Process-folios:

                Distribute mid-semester check list. Mark and return to me on Monday.

Shuffle to research groups for discussion of Browne chs. 15-16.
            --which steps/developments apply to your research topic, as summarized on left side of writing logs; may also have separate notes/TC.
                         --I check writing logs while they discuss.

Homework:        11/12     Browne, chapters 17-19. steps/developments apply to your research topic, as summarized on left side of writing logs. may also have separate notes/TC.

                          11/14     Browne, chapters 20-21. steps/developments apply to your research topic, as summarized on left side of writing logs. may also have separate notes/TC.


Week 12

Homework: 11/12     Browne, chapters 17-19. steps/developments apply to your research topic, as summarized on left side of writing logs. may also have separate notes/TC.

Research Groups: prepare for presentations next three meetings (patterns + evidence on CD’s views
during the Beagle voyage; note any changes in F ? T /because format) in following order:

             – varieties of humans

             – Lyellian geologist

             – argument from design/creationist


23                    11/14     Delay preparation of Browne, chapters 20-21. steps/developments apply to your research topic, as  summarized on left side of writing logs. may also have separate notes/TC. Instead use time to prepare presentations

Presentation by varieties of humans research group.

Collect checklists
            24   11/19     Report by CD as a Lyellian geologist research group.

            25   11/21     Report by CD as a creationist/argument from design research group.
 
            26   11/26     Journal assignment/writing log entry + notes. Change research groups, as necessary, to focus on Origin and DoM.

            27   11/28     Reports by all research groups on “To” part of research essay.

            28   12/3 Writing workshop

            29   12/5 Research paper due. Slide show?

Homework: in addition to preparations and continuing to write, everyone must have checked at least one journal systematically for articles on topic by Monday 11/26.
          --write up results in Writing Log + have notes for any articles on topic
                       --will check on Wednesday 11/26



 
 Week 13

24                    11/19     Sit in research groups.

Remind students of rest of semester due dates/expectations.
 
          – very few revised intros handed in. Cannot delay writing. At a minimum, expect your lit review to set forth range of interpretations of CD on Beagle voyage as covered in the Secondary Way packet
                      --focus to your topic/description/what’s been done/not done, etc.

Some process-folio checklists still outstanding. What to do with the ? on returned checklists.

Report by CD as a Lyellian geologist research group.

Phrenology demo using Fowler’s head.

While research groups are preparing for Wednesday, either the presentation or pulling together material in the Beagle period for the last time, collect/check writing log entries for materials due on 11/5 and 11/12 (Browne chaps 15-16, 17-19) on contingent events, ideas relevant to your research topic.



 25                    11/21

Report by CD as a creationist/argument from design research group.

Research group stock-taking.

Discuss rest of semester:
 
        26   11/26     In addition to preparations and continuing to write, everyone must have consulted at least one journal systematically for articles on topic.

                                      --write up results in Writing Log + have notes for any articles on topic. Bring writing logs to class; I  will check Journal assignment/writing log entry + notes.

                            Bring to class a print-out of your research essay as of this date – complete ¶s, outline, brackets, fragments.
 
                            Change research groups, as necessary, for next focus on Origin and DoM. Don’t forget about Desmond and Moore, Darwin: Life of a Tormented Evolutionist (on library closed reserve).
 

        27  11/28     Browne, chapters 20-21; entry in Writing Log, plus (separately) any notes of relevance to your topic.

                            Reports by all research groups on “To” part of research essay.

                            Bring to class a print-out of your research essay as of this date – complete ¶s, outline, brackets, fragments.

        28   12/3     Writing workshop: Bring to class a print-out of your research essay as of this date – complete ¶s, outline, brackets, fragments.

        29   12/5     Two copies of final research paper due at beginning of class (one is filed in History Dept.)
                                   Plus a copy of your conclusion for each member of your basic group.
                           To be fair to everyone in the seminar, there are no exceptions to the due date; everyone is expected to hand in a research essay, in whatever state of completeness, by 3:00 p.m.

Note: In the event that you are unable to make your essay as finished as you had hoped, I can only consider requests for an incomplete from students who turn in essays on 5 December that reflect accomplished research expectations through the 12th week of the semester (week of 12 November).

                          Distribute format and worksheets for presentations during the Final Examination period.

                          Slide show on the Galapagos Islands.

Final     12/13     Scheduled Final Examination Period: 3:00 - 5:00 p.m. Attendance mandatory.
                    Conference-style presentation of research paper “findings” to basic groups; turn in
                    presentation worksheets. Course evaluation.


Week 14

26                    11/26     In addition to preparations and continuing to write, everyone must have consulted at least one journal systematically for articles on topic.

                                          -- write up results in Writing Log + have notes for any articles on topic. Bring writing logs to class; I  will check Journal assignment/writing log entry + notes.

              Bring to class a print-out of your research essay as of this date – complete ¶s, outline, brackets, fragments.

                            -- What should the conclusion contain?
                                              Partial recap of the intro: your task with respect to the scholarly literature –  confirm, falsify, fill a gap, combination of these;
                                              your conclusion and how you accomplished it -- what kinds of sources did you feature, what kind of analysis (empathetic indwelling of CD’s worldview, tracking words, cf. CD with Lyell, etc.);

                                              significance of your findings in terms of the existing scholarly literature – eg. the persuasiveness of Browne’s argument, or Lyell’s, etc.) – and next lines of research on your topic.

 
Change research groups, as necessary, for next focus on Origin and DoM. Don’t forget about Desmond and Moore, Darwin: Life of a Tormented Evolutionist (on library closed reserve).
              --prepare reports for next meeting on “To” part of essay.


27                    11/28     Browne, chapters 20-21; entry in Writing Log, plus (separately) any notes of relevance to your topic.

                                      Reports by all research groups on “To” part of research essay.

                                      Bring to class a print-out of your research essay as of this date – complete ¶s, outline, brackets, fragments.


 Week 15
 
28                    12/3     Writing workshop: Bring to class a print-out of your research essay as of this date – complete ¶s, outline, brackets, fragments.

Follow-ups on last Wednesday presentations about CD’s stance in Origin and Descent of Man?

         – argument from design group did not have full amount of time.

Writing workshop: walk through the research essay expectations, using cover sheets as a guide.

         – some dos & don’ts from my review of the 11/26 drafts.
 

Reminders about what is due on Wednesday.


29                    12/5     Two copies of final research paper due at beginning of class (one is filed in History Dept.)
                                               Plus a copy of your conclusion for each member of your basic group.
                                    To be fair to everyone in the seminar, there are no exceptions to the due date; everyone is expected to hand in a research essay, in whatever state of completeness, by 3:00 p.m.

Writing logs due at beginning of class, too. Turn down corners of pages where you made entries for the following assignments:

         Browne, chapters 15-16; Browne, chapters 17-19; Browne, chapters 20-21.
 

Galapagos Islands slides.