HST 480 -
The Protests of the 50s, 60s, and 70s
HST 480
The Protests of the 50s, 60s, and 70s

Wednesdays 3:00-5:50
315C Wells Hall
PROFESSOR: Mark Kornbluh


Syllabus, Spring Semester 2003

Wednesdays 3:00-5:50

315C Wells Hall

Mark Kornbluh
E-Mail: Mark@mail.matrix.msu.edu
Office: 310 Auditorium Building
Office Hours: Wednesday, 1:30-2:30, and by appointment (355-9300)

This seminar will explore the mass protests of the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s, focusing on the Civil Rights Movement, the Student Movement, Anti-War Movement, and the Women’s Movement.  The is a readings, viewing, discussion, and research seminar.

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REQUIRED BOOKS:

Terry Anderson, The Movement and the Sixties.
William Chafe, Civilities and Civil Rights.
Malcolm X, The Autobiography of Malcolm X.
Abbie Hoffman, The Autobiography of Abby Hoffman.
George C. Herring, editor, The Pentagon Papers
Melvin Small, William D. Hoover, editors, Give Peace a Chance
Robert Cohen, Reginald E. Zelnik, editors, The Free Speech Movement: Reflections on Berkeley in the 1960s.
Ruth Rosen, The World Split Open: How the Modern Women’s Movement Changed America.

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COURSE SCHEDULE:

January 8: Introduction: The Protests of the 50s, 60s, and 70s
DOCUMENTS: Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas (1954);
VIEW:  Eyes on the Prize I, Number 1. Awakenings.

January 15: Civil Rights I
READ: William Chafe, Civilities and Civil Rights, preface-171.
DOCUMENTS: Martin Luther King, "Letter from a Birmingham Jail” (1963);The Civil Rights Act of 1964;
VIEW: Eyes on the Prize I, Number III. Ain’t Scared of Your Jails.
ADDITIONAL INTERNET RESOURCES:
1. Montgomery Bus Boycott Page: http://socsci.colorado.edu/~jonesem/montgomery.html

January 22: Civil Rights II
READ: William Chafe, Civilities and Civil Rights, pp.172-end.
VIEW: Eyes on the Prize I, Number V. Mississippi: Is this America?
ADDITIONAL INTERNET RESOURCES:
1.King and the Civil Rights Movement: http://www.seattletimes.com/mlk/index.html
2. Greensboro Sit-Ins: http://www.sitins.com/
3. Mississippi Oral Histories: http://www-dept.usm.edu/~mcrohb/
4. SNCC Page: http://www.ibiblio.org/sncc/index.html

            PROJECT PROPOSALS DUE: January 22

January 29: Black Power
READ: Malcolm X, The Autobiography of Malcolm X
VIEW: Eyes on the Prize II, Number I, The Time Has Come.
ADDITIONAL INTERNET RESOURCES:
1. Malcolm X Speaks: http://webcorp.com/civilrights/
2. Malolm X Research Site: http://www.brothermalcolm.net/
3. Malcolm X Museum: http://www.themalcolmxmuseum.org/
4. Bobby Seale Page: http://www.bobbyseale.com/

FEBRUARY 5: Introduction to Radicalism collection at Special Collections at the MSU Library
MEET IN W452 IN THE MAIN LIBRARY WITH DR. PETER BERG
No Assigned Readings, work on Research project.

February 12: The Birth of the New Left and SDS
READ: Anderson, The Movement and the Sixties, preface-p. 130.
DOCUMENTS: John F. Kennedy, Inaugural Address; Students for a Democratic Society, The Port Huron Statement; Lyndon B. Johnson, Great Society Speech (1964)
VIEW: TBA
ADDITIONAL INTERNET RESOURCES:
1. SDS Collection at Berkeley http://sunsite.berkeley.edu:2020/dynaweb/teiproj/fsm/ro/SDS/@Generic__CollectionView;pt=SDS

            PROPOSED PROJECT BIBLIOGRAPHY DUE FEBRUARY 12

February 19: The Free Speech Movement
READ: The Free Speech Movement
VIEW: Berkeley in the Sixties
ADDITIONAL INTERNET RESOURCES:
1. The Free Speech Movement Archives: http://www.fsm-a.org/
2. The Free Speech Movement Digital Archive http://bancroft.berkeley.edu/FSM/
3. The Free Speech Movement Collection http://www.oac.cdlib.org/dynaweb/virtual/freesp/

February 26: The Vietnam War
READ: The Pentagon Papers,
DOCUMENTS: Martin Luther King, Jr. "Declaration of Independence from the War in Vietnam" (1967); "A Call to Resist IllegitimateAuthority" (1966); War Powers Act of 1973.
VIEW: Hearts and Minds
ADDITIONAL INTERNET RESOURCES:
1. Vietnam War Internet Project: http://www.vwip.org/vwiphome.html
2. Vietnam: Echoes from the Wall: http://www.teachvietnam.org/

March 5: No Class: Spring Break

March 12: The Anti-War Movement
READ: Movement and the Sixties, pp. 130-238; Give Peace a Chance.
VIEW: The War at Home
ADDITIONAL INTERNET RESOURCES:
1. Winter Soldier Investigation: http://lists.village.virginia.edu/sixties/HTML_docs/Resources/Primary/Winter_Soldier
2. COINTELPRO: http://www.derechos.net/paulwolf/cointelpro/

            DETAILED PAPER OUTLINE DUE March 12

MARCH 19: The Counter-Culture
READ: Movement and the Sixties, pp. 238-291; The Autobiography of Abby Hoffman
VIEW: Berkeley in the Sixties
ADDITIONAL INTERNET RESOURCES:
1.The Diggers Archives OnLine: http://www.diggers.org
2. The Psychedelic 60s: http://www.lib.virginia.edu/speccol/exhibits/sixties/index.html

MARCH 26: The Women’s Movement I

READ: The World Split Open
DOCUMENTS: Adlai Stevenson, A Purpose for Modern Women (1955); N.O.W. Statement of Purpose (1966); N.O.W. Bill of Rights,  (1968); "What Are We Complaining About?" (1970)
ADDITIONAL INTERNET RESOURCES:
1 .Timeline of Women's Movement: http://www.feminist.org/research/chronicles/fc1953.html
2. Documents of the Women’s Movement: http://scriptorium.lib.duke.edu/wlm/

April 2: Beyond the Sixties: Race Class, and Gender in Contemporary America
READ: Movement and the Sixties, pp. 292-423.
VIEW: Eyes on the Prize II, Number IV, The Promised Land.
ADDITIONAL INTERNET RESOURCES: TBA

APRIL 9: NO CLASS: WORK ON PROJECT

APRIL 16: Project Report

APRIL 23: Project Reports

            RESEARCH PAPER  DUE APRIL 30, 3:00 P.M.

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: 

This class is a reading, viewing, discussion and research seminar.  Both attendance and participation at seminar meetings are essential, as is participation on HST480, the electronic discussion list for this course.  Discussions will center around the weekly readings and videos.  In preparation for these discussions, everyone will be asked to post a short piece to the discussion list.  These will vary in shape, but will usually involve identifying important questions in the readings. Commutatively, participation in class and on the discussion list will count for 40% of the course grade

The major written requirement for this class is an independent research project which will count for 60% of the course grade. Project proposals are due on January 22.  Proposals must be approved and may hve to be modified to ensure that each student is undertaking a distinct project that can be completed within one semester. A bibliographic report following a proscribed form is due on February 12 and a detailed paper outline is due on March 12. Each student will present their project orally to the seminar during the final two weeks of the semester. As these assignments are scheduled well in advance, they are required to be in on time.

HST480 DISCUSSION LIST:

This course has an electronic discussion list to facilitate further discussion of the course readings and videos.  All members of the class are expected to participate in this electronic discussion list.  On some weeks, the list will be used for weekly assignments, on others to extend our discussions beyond the classroom.

The list is unmoderated so that messages submitted by class participants are immediately distributed to other class members.

This discussion list is linked to a website to facilitate retrieval of messages http://coursesa.matrix.msu.edu/~hst480).  The HST480 logs which are stored on this site will allow class participants to look back over past conversations on the discussion list and comment upon them.  The Website includes a variety of additional information relevant to HST480 course materials including the course syllabus, and primary documents.

To subscribe to HST480, send an e-mail message to listserv@h-net.msu.edu

with no subject and only this text:

      sub HST480  firstname lastname

Your request should look something like this:

      sub HST480 John Smith

You will receive a confirmation that your request has been received.

To unsubscribe, send this message to LISTSERV@h-net.msu.edu

      unsub  HST480

If you have any questions or experience any difficulties in attempting to subscribe or unsubscribe, please send a message to me at  Mark@mail.matrix.msu.edu


GRADING AND PAPER COMMENTS:

In the body of your papers, a check mark indicates a good point.  Several marks are sometimes used for emphasis as are the comments, "good, excellent, or yes."  Critical comments on your papers are both substantive and stylistic.  Besides factual comments, substantive comments are used to indicate where you fail to fully explain a point, give evidence to support your case, or link your ideas together.  Consistency is important and internal contradictions in your papers are noted.  I also indicate where your writing and choice of words fail to get your ideas across, as well as places where they are awkward.  Spelling, grammatical, and tense errors as well as contractions are unacceptable in graduate papers.

Critical Abbreviations include:

AWK - Awkward phrasing or construction.

CW or WC - Choice of word is poor.

WW - Wrong word.  Word does not say what you mean.

Transition - Missing a transition.

SP - Spelling error.

GR - Grammatical error.

Contraction - Contraction is used.

Run On - Run on sentence.

Tense - Wrong tense.

Pronoun - Pronoun is unclear or wrong.

- New paragraph.

??? - Point is not clear. 

Meaning - What you are trying to say is not clear.

Writing - Your writing obscures your ideas.