Week 1

1                     8/27        Conflicting Worldviews: B. Trevan, "Assembly Line." Discussion of course syllabus.

Bring to class: sheets of yellow paper and exercises; 11x17 sheet for seating chart; syllabi.

Syllabus: questions?

Distribute "Assembly Line": Read/write S worksheet  -- discuss in groups/class.
                                                                                     --hand in for me to review and return.

            Homework for Wed: formulate worldviews for Winthrop and the Indian for discussion.

Discuss syllabus.

            Homework for Wed: student in each basic group read for worldview (what's his/her point of view? Outlook on      present-world picture? Expectations for future?) of one character (Sgnarelle, Martine, Valère, Lucas [if four in group].


2                     8/29         Molière, "A Doctor in Spite of Himself," Act 1.

Bring to class: sheets of yellow paper and exercises; 11x17 sheet for seating chart; syllabi; Molière; Jacob.

Return S worksheets with verbal comments. Think of summaries as a synopsis of WHAT happened, perhaps in the FROM- TO format if suitable.
                      --introduce SoA worksheet

        Groups: worldviews for Winthrop and the Indian --  introduce TC notion
                                                                                          --discuss, using TC for evidence.

        Homework: using TCs on two characters, formulate author's thesis.

Molière's Doctor: - discuss what this act is about (ie., a summary of it).

        -- character (Sgnarelle, Martine, Valère, Lucas [if four in group]) worldviews (what's his/her point of view? Outlook on present-world picture? Expectations for future?).
                                               suggestions of the author's leanings and argument?
                                               In shuffle groups: Develop a TC for your character.

        Homework for next meeting: continue TC for acts 2 & 3 of Molière's Doctor; cluster 2 characters. Jacob, intro: what are the six or so characteristics of the new science (3-4)? Her definition of the new science (5)? Her assumptions (5-6)? Literacy, audience, and geographical variation (7-8).
 
 


Week 2

                       9/3         Labor Day - no class.

3                     9/5         Molière, "A Doctor in Spite of Himself," Acts 2 & 3.
                                     Jacob, Introduction.

Fill out Academic Information Sheets (to be used for new basic groups, email list, etc.)

"Assembly Line" - review the three kinds of worksheets we've covered GTS writing exercise.

Molière's Doctor: Referring to your S worksheet for act 1 and notes/TC for acts 2 & 3,
                                    --develop SoA for play as a whole (basic groups).
                                                --class discuss.
                                                        --partial (WHAT & HOW) GTS for Molière.

Jacob, intro: Class discuss her six or so characteristics of the new science (3-4)?
                    Her definition of the new science (5)?
                    Her assumptions (5-6)?
                    Literacy, audience, and geographical variation (7-8).

                                use Jacob as context in which to situate Molière's message - WHY significant
                                            --basic groups -- class discuss.
                                                        --develop full thesis statement (basic groups)
                                                                         --Homework (GTS exercise)

        Homework for next meeting: Sobel, parts 1 & 2. Read all chapters and be ready to discuss summations and the makings of an SoA.
 
 


Week 3

4                    9/10           Sobel, parts 1 & 2. Begin out-of-synch assignments-readings generally discussed the meeting following when they are due.

Seating: in new basic groups.

Mini-lecture: Western intellectual tradition and the Aristotelian world view.

Basic groups: develop TC with following rubrics -- New Science (Galileans); Aristotelians; audience; women's conditions - for part 1 of Sobel. [will continue with part 2 on Wednesday, plus another mini-lecture]

Homework: Bring Moliere and Jacob to class, along with Sobel. We'll be looking for representatives of the New Science vs. Aristotelians in Moliere, plus questions of audience (and Jacob's general argument) in both Moliere and Sobel.
 

In Sobel, parts 3, 4, & 5: one person/basic group read one chapter from each part (same order) and write an S worksheet for each chapter. For each chapter, prepare TC with following rubrics (themes): New Science (Galileans); Aristotelians; audience; women's conditions.




5                    9/12        Homework: Sobel, parts 3, 4, & 5: one person/basic group read one chapter from each part (same order) and write an S worksheet for each chapter. For each chapter, prepare TC with following rubrics (themes): New Science (Galileans); Aristotelians; audience; women's conditions.

Terrorist attack on WTC caused an interruption in the schedule as set forth the previous meeting. PV-J presented own views of how those of us not directly affected should respond; then had some discussion.

Mini-lecture: Western intellectual tradition and the Aristotelian world view - review of first part, and finished off by showing how Galileo represented a second synthesis of the Aristotelian and Platonic branches of western scientific tradition.

Did not have time to discuss New Science vs. Aristotelians in Moliere, or the audience question from Jacob.

Collected all (non-marked) worksheets prepared for Moliere and the S&TC worksheets due for Sobel, parts 3, 4,5

Homework: Sobel, part 6. Jacob, chapter 1 (distributed handout; each person in group take one question to prepare for discussion in class on Monday).


Week 4

6                     9/17      Due Sobel, part 6. Jacob, chapter 1 (including discussion questions).

Reviewed the Moliere worksheets handed in previous meeting:

Not marked in deference to the drops&adds period, but the following were assigned during this period: TCs for major characters covering all three acts (most are quite promising, containing the expected elements); GTS for Moliere's message (most were assertions, some including perennial conclusions -- love conquers all, etc.)

Begin process of rethinking the GTS by (1) connecting various characters to two of the themes for which you clustered in Sobel - New Science vs. Aristotelians in Moliere. Refer to Jacob/lecture notes/Sobel for the defining features of each.
                    --formulate a GTS for Moliere's "Doctor" that situates him in the debate about the two world systems.


Mini-lecture: Jacob's thesis from the introduction.

Shuffle groups: discuss the questions assigned in the Jacob study guide for chapter 1 -- shuffle groups.
                                             --presentation of Q1 to the class + discussion.

Sobel S and TC worksheets for parts 3, 4, & 5: distribute copies in basic groups. Review parts 1 - 5 in preparation for discussion on Wednesday about Galileo's trial (what he did/did not do, and its significance - how does your interpretation of Sobel compare with Jacob's of this issue?). Does this book about Galileo's daughter, Maria Celeste, say enough about her to justify the title? Or should it have been titled, Galileo, who by the way had two daughters he locked away in a convent?

Homework: TC for entire play, clustering New Science and Old Science (Xian-Aristotelians).



7                    9/19       Molière, "The Imaginary Invalid": TC for entire play, clustering New Science and Old Science (Xian-Aristotelians), due at beginning of class; discuss next mtg.
                                    Jacob, chapter 2 (43-52) -- study guide, with divided resp for Qs

Continue discussion of Jacob chap 1 Study Guide: Qs 2, 3, 4, and the Baconian vision.
                    --board-work on Jacob's SoA on Old vs. New Science in Italy and England.

Clarify expectations for first essay exercise (thesis ¶ + first substantiating ¶ + skeletal format for rest) due a week from Friday.

Return to the Old vs. New Science dispute in first half of 17th century:
                    - Sobel's argument (SoA and thesis)?
                    - how does her interpretation of Galileo's contributions, trial, and consequences for development and dissemination of New Science to various audiences compare to Jacob's?

Homework: Molière, "The Misanthrope" (TC for Old and New Science); Jacob, chapter 2 (52-69) -- Study questions already assigned, but reminder (1) that everyone is expected to read entire chapter, and (2) this chapter offers context on the French situation that would most directly affect Molière (Descartes's synthesis).



Week 5

8                    9/24        Molière, "The Misanthrope" (TC for Old and New Science); Jacob, chapter 2 (52-69) -- study questions for discussion.

Folders: return Molière, "The Imaginary Invalid" TC and Sobel worksheets; reminder about what's due and the marking system.

Discuss Molière, "The Imaginary Invalid" - Old and New science references from the TC patterns that will help you determine his stance in the dispute.

Jacob:      1. Board review of what we discussed about Galileo High Culture audience.
                2. Shuffle groups to formulate collective responses to the 2nd Jacob worksheet (on chaps 1 & 2).
                3. Began to discuss the Erastian alternative for England & Low Countries High & Low Culture audiences.
                4. For next time: The Cartesian alternative for moderate Catholic countries and areas fearing revolution.

Distribute essay #1 cover-sheets and clarify expectations.

Homework: Locke, chaps 1 and 2 (S Worksheet for chap 2); study guide to be turned in when we have finished Locke - use for brief notes/TC format.
                    Sobel - pull together your ideas for discussion on Wednesday, including comparison of her interpretation of Galileo's trial with Jacob's.



9                     9/26      Hand in S Worksheet for Locke, chap 2. A catch-up and review day.

Discuss Molière, "The Misanthrope" - Old and New science references from the TC patterns that will help you determine his stance in the dispute. Worksheets suggest that you found this play less useful for this theme than the other two, but there were some interesting finds.
                    - showed how examples presented could be used as substantiating evidence for essay, emphasizing the need to explain meaning of quotes (in terms of Jacob/Sobel), not restating them.

Jacob:          1.Review Bacon's Erastian alternative that eventuated in the association of the New Science with Puritan revolution and social instability when the audience is "Low Culture."

                    2. The situation in France: began with shuffle groups on the questions they were responsible for in the study guide for chaps 1 & 2. No time for full discussion, so decided to use the essays to flush out what was clear & unclear in this chapter. Should be able to respond to the following Qs:
                            - why did educated elites on the Continent (and some in British isles) consider Cartesian synthesis an acceptable alternative to Gassendi's skepticism and millenarian Bacon?
                            - how did Descartes pull off an intellectual synthesis that satisfied individual scientists who preferred New Science, the orthodox view that absolutism was most effective bulwark against social upheaval, and critics of mercantilist controls on trade?

Walked through the cover sheet for first essay exercise.

Reminder: Essay #1 due in V-J's box in 301 Morrill Hall (History Department) by 11:55 a.m. on Friday 9/28.

Homework: S Worksheet, summarizing each of chapters 3-8 in Locke.
                    Delay reading Jacob chapter 3 until I distribute a worksheet.


Week 6

10                     10/1      Due at beginning of class: S Worksheet, summarizing each of chapters 3-8 in Locke.

Stock-taking Quick-Write: on Blue sheet write out the Qs you had after preparing the first essay. Make the Qs as specific as possible.

Stock-taking on Dava Sobel: Does this book about Galileo's daughter, Maria Celeste, say enough about her to justify the title? Or should it have been titled, Galileo, who by the way had two daughters he locked away in a convent? How does her interpretation of Galileo's science, the trial, and his projected audience compare with Jacob's?

Board-work on the Cartesian synthesis and (anticipating chapter 3 in Jacob) the latudinarian High Culture use of both Descartes and Bacon as an antidote to Puritan science and upheaval.
                        --lecture on opening sections of chap 3.

Discussion of Locke: a social thought experiment in the New Science vein (cannot test this on existing populations; mathematical and geometrical logic; history (observation) present, but subsumed to the "mechanistic" tradition in New Science.

                Chap 1 - set up with a bit on absolutism and divine right of kingship.
                        - note the anti-Hobbesian elements.

                Chap 2 - state of nature - freedom, equality (hence reciprocity must be granted), right as executor.

                            Law of nature - reason (shows that we are all equal, independent, and should not intrude on an equal's life, liberty, or possessions); not license - may not take own life.

                            What are the inconveniences of the state of nature?

                            What kind of compact ends the state of nature?

Homework: Jacob, chapter 3 (study guide; divide questions and write S summation of each).
                        Locke, chapters 9-11, 15, 18, 19. (S Worksheet).



11                    10/3      Due: Jacob, chapter 3 (study guide - one question selected); Locke, chapters 9-11, 15, 18, 19 (S worksheet - chapter synopses).

Begin with discussion of Qs I asked them to review for today, based on returned worksheets, for Chap 2:

                        state of nature - freedom, equality (hence reciprocity must be granted), right as executor.

                        Law of nature - reason (shows that we are all equal, independent, and should not intrude on an equal's life, liberty, or possessions); not license - may not take own life.

                        What are the inconveniences of the state of nature?

                        What kind of compact ends the state of nature?

Then proceed to discussion of chaps 3-8.
                        - each group responsible for facilitating discussion of chaps 3-7 (gather thoughts discussion).
                                            Focus on the points that were muddled/confused/missed on worksheet synopses.
                        - together work on chapter 8.
                        - rough out the initial parts of a SoA for Locke (from God social compacts).

Homework: Jacob, chapter 4 (one question each from study guide -- synopsis on sheet provided). Defoe, intro - 101 (through entry for June 17; TC for parallels/differences to Locke on state of nature/law of nature/first occupier who extracts what he needs from "wasteland" and other elements of Locke's concept of property .


Week 7

12                     10/8        Finished group-facilitated discussion of chaps 3-7, then proceeded to discuss remaining assigned chapters with exception of 19 (on dissolution of civil government)
                        --continue developing SoA for Locke's argument.

Jacob, chap 3: Newtonian and Radical Enlightenments
                        - reviewed the emergence of a Latitudinarian position that found the Cartesian synthesis more appealing than the Puritan. Introduced Hobbes as a liberal counterpart to Locke.



13                     10/10     Jacob, chapter 5 (136-44).
                        Defoe, 101-248 (through paragraph that ends, ". . . friends or enemies.").

Jacob, chap 3: Newtonian and Radical Enlightenments
            - need to show how Hobbes's liberal alternative has advantages over Descartes with respect to political situation from perspective of High Culture Englishmen, but his support for absolutism become increasingly untenable as the restored Stuarts seek to restore divine right of kingship and Catholicism.
                --growing hostility to materialism in mechanistic philosophy of Hobbes and Descartes.
                        --Boyle's corpuscular philosophy
                           Newton at Cambridge
                                    --the Newtonian synthesis and Newtonian Enlightenment
                                            --how compare with Whig/Radical Enlightenment?
                                                        --Q: Locke as which Enlightenment in embryo?

Where does Defoe fit?
                        - how does his argument compare with Locke & Newtonian synthesis?
                        - does he belong to one of the Enlightenments?
                        - are there Baconian/Puritanical vestiges in RC?

Homework: Defoe, 248 - end (continue TC); Montesquieu, preface, letters 1-14. (No worksheets required as yet for Montesquieu)
 


Week 8

14                    10/15       Defoe, 248 - end (hold on to TC prepared); Montesquieu, preface, letters 1-14.

Discussion of Defoe: SoA for the novel;

                    -- patterns in the four themes we've clustered as potential evidence for essay #2.
                            --juxtaposition with Locke (do some examples in basic groups and bring to class on Wednesday for writing workshop on substantiating paragraphs.

Continue with mini-lecture/discussion of the Newtonian and Radical Enlightenments according to Jacob
                                --use to establish both the declarative and explanatory components of thesis statement

Writing workshop:
                        - Hacker exercises (its vs. it's: misuse of "this" for antecedents).
                        - writing exercise on setting up the thesis paragraph

Homework: 10/17 Montesquieu, letters 15-96 (outline Enlightenment themes to keep in mind/cluster



15                     10/17          Montesquieu, letters 15-96. (Have selected several themes that fit Jacob's def of Enlightenment - and cluster them).

Defoe/Locke: cannot cover all potential themes, but could set up a focused thesis statement, where you begin with a generalization about the novel as a fictional popularization and then narrow to particular theme(s) for the purpose of what should be limited to a 5-page paper.
                        - discuss selected themes/examples from Defoe.
                        - may need to use the context section of thesis paragraph to establish Locke's position on the selected themes.
                                    --declarative portion of second writing exercise.

Radical and Newtonian Enlightenments - Jacob, chap.4; contexts for Locke and Defoe (Locke fits the Newtonian since he does not permit the kind of rebellion/alterations in the legislative advocated by some radicals - but would allow for slow expansion of powers of commons in Parliament if done within the bounds of the original compact.
                        --explanatory portion of writing exercise.
                                --complete the topic sentences portion of the writing exercise.

Montesquieu's Persian Letters: parable of the Troglodytes, and the continuation of Locke's critique of absolutism as a sample theme of the first generation of Enlightenment philosophes.
                        --look for other Enlightenment themes in rest of epistolatory novel (will develop def of E next meeting).

*** 10/19 Essay #2 due in V-J's box in 301 Morrill Hall (History Department) by 11:55 a.m.

Homework: 10/22 Montesquieu, letters 97-161.
 


Week 9

16                    10/22        Due: Montesquieu, letters 97-161.

Prelim mini-lecture on absolutist worldview to 1680, and why Jacob is significant in explaining how Newton & Locke set the stage for a transition to the Enlightenment, and why it may have happened.
                    ? In-class worksheet on different Enlightenments.

The Enlightenment characteristics and three generations
                    ? Montesquieu as representative of the 1st via Persian Letters.
                    ? parable of the Troglodytes (discussed in class– but left them to sort out meaning)
                    Divided responsibility for following themes, by basic groups:
                    ? the reasonable state
                    ? treatment of women
                    ? religion
                    ? how compare with Locke?
                    ? human nature (reason vs. passions, habit, custom, etc.)



17                    10/24        Due: Rousseau, preface, books 1 & 2 (scan/read selected pages) – hand in TC.

Distribute mid-semester check-list for process folio. Students check off what they have, then return to me.

Hacker: summations and paraphrases (173-74); integrating quotations (174-78), but note exception for the parenthetical references.
                     – it’s vs. its
                     – vague reference to this (35).

Montesquieu: discuss themes assigned for today’s class. Designate items to follow hereafter (in Rousseau, etc.).

Mini-lecture on countervailing passions, reason as self-interest, and capitalism.

Due for Monday: next assignment in Rousseau, including continuation of TC.

In addition, review Defoe on Crusoe-Friday relationship (esp voluntary submission into slavery and RC’s absolutist response), Locke on same themes, and Jacob on absolutism (Descartes and Hobbes).

Please bring all three books to class.


Week 10

18                    10/29        Due: Rousseau, books 3 &  4 (scan/read selected pages).

Complete discussion of Montesquieu as representative of 1st generation philosophes via Persian Letters.
                    ? parable of the Troglodytes–what’s the meaning? How compare with Locke?

                            Basic groups:
                                    –  treatment of women
                                    –  religion
                                    –  how compare with Locke?

Discuss patterns in second essays:

Conclude with exercise that requires one to develop full thesis and examples of analysis: Defoe on Crusoe-Friday relationship (esp voluntary submission into slavery and RC’s absolutist response), Locke on same themes, and Jacob on absolutism (Descartes and Hobbes).

Lecture on capitalism.

Rousseau? Or delay until more in class have read it?

Homework: Rousseau, book 5 (scan/read selected pages). Wollstonecraft, (Maria) intro - chapter 2.



19                    10/31    Due: Rousseau, book 5 (scan/read selected pages). Wollstonecraft, (Maria) intro - ch 2.

Concluded discussion of the Crusoe-Friday relationship, with focus on the explanatory element (Hobbes and absolutism as a rational choice–hence liberalism.

Set up basic group discussion of Emile: analyze parallel chronological/age and stage of mental development and appropriate education, by books in Emile:

          Basic groups: prepared books 1 & 2, class discussion of book 1; continue with books 2-4 on Monday.
 

                    Homework:     11/5  Wollstonecraft, chapter 3-end (complete TC). Jacob, chapter 5.


Week 1

Due: Wollstonecraft, chapter 3-end (complete TC). Jacob, chapter 5.

            Discussion of books 2 & 3 in Emile.

            From Wollstonecraft’s Preface, what did she mean by “a woman of sensibility,” with “an improving mind”?
                    --is this within the Enlightenment perspective?
                    --is this a feminist perspective?

Homework: 11/7 Goethe, book 1. Prepare S worksheet, keeping in mind the four stereotypical characters; prepare a TC for feelings/emotions; Enlightenment reason; views of nature.

Coming up:
    22        11/12     Goethe, book 2. Prepare S worksheet, keeping in mind the four stereotypical characters; prepare a TC for feelings/emotions; Enlightenment reason; views of  nature.

    23        11/14     Review of Enlightenment and Counter-Enlightenment
 

***        11/16     Essay #3 due in V-J’s box in 301 Morrill Hall (History Department) by 11:55 a.m.
 



21                    11/7    Due: Goethe, book 1. Prepare S worksheet, keeping in mind the four stereotypical characters; prepare a TC for feelings/emotions; Enlightenment reason; views of nature.

Emile: mini-lecture on book 4, reasoning of the intellect to show why Rousseau thinks Emile must leave the solitary state and what Rousseau thinks is necessary for an effective male citizen in a republic guided by the “general will.”

                    – basic groups on book 5: Sophy as representative of female nature, appropriate education, and the ideal helpmeet.

                    – helpmeet vs. handmaid: what does Rousseau consider the real talents and limitations of the female sex (as distinct from species-characteristics that Sophy shares with Emile)?

                               Reasoning of the senses
                                         (Common sense) _________________  Vocational ceiling for some men; limit of a woman’s rational capability?

                               Reasoning of the intellect    blue-stockings?     some men are educated to this stage; (Understanding)

Wollstonecraft:

            Preface, what did she mean by “a woman of sensibility,” with “an improving mind”?
                      --is this within the Enlightenment perspective?
                      --is this a feminist perspective?

           What are the lessons in Mary’s story? What are the “wrongs of woman” (why woman, and not women)?

Writing workshop:

                topic from Enlightenment readings ? preliminary historical question ? which authors (one featured?) ? then return to the historical question and revise, if necessary (feedback loop)

               Enlightenment characteristics (handout and Jacob, chap 5)


Week 12
22                    11/12     Goethe, book 2. Prepare S worksheet, keeping in mind the four stereotypical characters; prepare a TC for feelings/emotions; Enlightenment reason; views of nature.

Emile: summary discussion of Sophy as the ideal helpmeet.

          – review book in terms of the making of a “natural man,” self-sufficient in mind and body, who can withstand corruption and envy and egoism when introduced to society; and with Sophy bring about a moral, Enlightened society in which our natural abilities and inclinations work for collective ends rather than purely individual self-enrichment.
                         --what are the Enlightenment elements in this perspective? (Where the matches with Locke?)
                         --what are the Counter-Enlightenment, proto-Romantic elements in this perspective? (Where the matches with Werther?)

Review principles of the Enlightenment (use notes on Emile, handout, and Jacob)
              – Jacob, 105-07: def. of Enlightenment, featuring connections to new science

              – Jacob, 137-40: the connection between the literary and practical Enlightenment, and the English as the model for other lands (absence of effective ultra-conservative opposition early in 18th c, and therefore less radical than on continent; but growth of radical elements in north of England toward end of the century).

Wollstonecraft, Maria, or the Wrongs of Woman
              – 32, the E critique of enthusiasm and unrestrained passions (also 41-42; notion of reason as constraint on excesses of passions; the picturesque, 46; passions gross unless “regulated by an improving mind,” 65).
              – 35, yet the paeon to love and Rousseau’s Heloïse: indefinable emotions, reposing nature, sublime sensibility; the attraction of a manly voice and a noble mind (37).
              – 45, Darnford critical of the American character (selfish).
              – 48-51, the justification for “free love.”
              – chap 5, Jemima’s story (from abusive father ? guard in a private mental asylum.
              – 67, critique of hospitals, doctors, and med students.

Writing workshop
 



23                    11/14     Review of Enlightenment and Counter-Enlightenment

Writing workshop:
     – thesis statement vs. statement of intent/assertion.
                    --make certain that 1. of #5 is truly a thesis, that it establishes the author’s position on the selected topic and in makes an explicit comparison to the Enlightenment.
 
    – Declarative part of thesis: straw poll of which of the three E authors are featured.
                    -- If many are using Wollstonecraft, proceed to finish discussion of Maria, Or Wrongs of Woman.
                    --If most are using Montesquieu or Rousseau, then field questions necessary to establish the declarative parts of the thesis.

     – Explanatory part of the thesis: Jacob and handouts.
 

***        11/16     Essay #3 due in V-J’s box in 301 Morrill Hall (History Department) by 4:30 p.m.
                         [note change in time due; MH closes between 5 and 5:30, so cannot count on slipping essay under my office door after 5:00.]
                                        -- attach 2nd essay, including marked cover sheet.

Homework:  24  11/19     Shelley, chapters 1-10. TC for science (method, principles, goals), Enlightenment characteristics, Romantic characteristics. Keep in mind potential comparisons to other authors we have read; eg., search for the infinite in Werther and Frankenstein’s desire to vivify the monster.


Week 13

24                    11/19     Shelley, chapters 1-10. TC for science (method, principles, goals), Enlightenment characteristics, Romantic characteristics. Keep in mind potential comparisons to other authors we have read; eg., search for the infinite in Werther and Frankenstein’s desire to vivify the monster.

Note: Heiberg’s April Fools is at SBS, only – ask for it at the information desk. $5.00. Will be discussing it after Thanksgiving, and part of the final examination exercise as a comparison with Dickens’ Hard Times, among other readings.

Review of fundamental Enlightenment principles
         --which are evident in “Declaration of Rights of Man and Citizen”? (basic groups)
 

Stock-taking: what we’ve covered, and what to look for in readings the rest of the semester:

                        – mini-lecture with board-work         [how achieve it?]
                                                 human nature    -->            what kind of society is natural and desirable?

          – final examination exercise will ask you to develop an interpretation of what Dickens proposes as an answer to this question, and how that answer compares with general Enlightenment and Romantic perspectives.
 
          – (basic groups) place major authors/characters on a passion ? reason continuum (for Wednesday, will work in characters from Frankenstein).

Counter-Enlightenment via a discussion of Goethe’s Werther.

                         Homework:  25  11/21     Shelley, chapters 11- end. TC for science (method, principles, goals),
                         Enlightenment characteristics, Romantic characteristics. Keep in mind potential
                         comparisons to other authors we have read.

Marked third essays will be returned on Monday following Thanksgiving.



25                    11/21     Due: Shelley, chapters 11- end (TC for science (method, principles, goals), Enlightenment characteristics, Romantic characteristics.
 

Exercise on liberalism vs. classical liberalism
             --Review Enlightenment vs. Counter-Enlightenment/Romanticism handout

                             --placement of Goethe’s characters on  passions ? reason continuum

                                            --structure of novella (SoA: epistolatory – Werther’s letters, to whom, why, with what tone, etc.) -->  editor’s conclusion (what is editor like, his attitude toward Werther, etc.)

                                                           --Goethe’s thesis/lesson (via his depiction of the characters & editor)
 
                                                                             -- how connect him to the Enlightenment/Counter-E context?
 

Insufficient number of TCs handed in on Frankenstein for us to begin discussion today. Please catch up over holidays, but don’t fall behind on Dickens – Hard Times is the linchpin to an accomplished final examination exercise.

Rest of semester:

26        11/26     Dickens, book 1. (TC for human nature (reasons & passions), Enlightenment characteristics, Romantic characteristics.

27        11/28     Dickens, book 2. (TC for human nature (reasons & passions), Enlightenment characteristics, Romantic characteristics. Heiberg, April Fools, Afterword + 2- 29; be sure to read endnotes.

28        12/3        Dickens, book 3. (TC for human nature (reasons & passions), Enlightenment characteristics, Romantic characteristics. Heiberg, April Fools, 29-58; be sure to read endnotes.

29        12/5       Final project workshop. Course review.

Final     12/12     Scheduled Final Examination Period: 12:45 - 2:45 p.m. Attendance mandatory.  Out-of-class examination project due at 12:45. There will be in-class activities, as well writing course evaluations.
                           


Week 14

26                    11/26     Due: Dickens, book 1. (TC for human nature (reasons & passions), Enlightenment characteristics, Romantic characteristics.

Finish from last meeting: Goethe’s thesis/lesson (via his depiction of the characters & editor)
 
                             ---how connect him to the Enlightenment/Counter-E context? (use the time-line sheet and the two-column sheet on the subjective vs. universal “I.”

                                            --review counter-E, and set up Romanticism

Mary W. Shelley’s Frankenstein: SoA – why set up the story as Frankenstein’s tale of warning to Walton?

             – generational rebellion: who does F blame for his obsession with the causes of life?

             – Enlightenment science vs. Romantic science?

             – Enlightenment characteristics?

             – Romantic characteristics?


27                    11/28     Dickens, book 2. (TC for human nature (reasons & passions), Enlightenment characteristics, Romantic characteristics. Heiberg, April Fools, Afterword + 2-29; be sure to read endnotes.

Comments/questions about 3rd essays, marked and returned on Monday.

Human nature – what is meant, and what to look for in Hard Times, etc.

Distribute final exam materials to date (worksheet + instructions).

Continue discussion of Shelley – topics from prior session, plus human nature.
          --her thesis/message + matching to worldview (Romanticism)
                  --1st or 2nd generation?
 
New Enlightenment as extension (1st generation) and modification (2nd generation) of the Enlightenment.
                                 -- utilitarianism                                       --Dickens’s critique.


 Week 15

28                    12/3     Due: Dickens, book 3. (TC for human nature (reasons & passions), Enlightenment characteristics, Romantic characteristics. Heiberg, April Fools, 29-58; be sure to read endnotes.


29                    12/5     Final project workshop.
                                    Course review.
 
 
 
 
 

Final                     12/12     Scheduled Final Examination Period: 12:45 - 2:45 p.m. Attendance mandatory. Out-of-class examination project due at 12:45. There will be in-class activities, as well writing course evaluations.