WINWOOD MEMORIALS 

Selection from Sir Ralph Winwood, Memorials of Affairs of State in the Reigns of Queen  Elizabeth and King James I, 3 vols. (London, 1725), 2: 16-19.  The spelling has been modernized.  Winwood was a diplomat.
 
 

[16] The Lord Cecyll to Mr. Winwood

15th February 1603
Mr. Winwood:
        . . . I should lately have written unto you in the Behalf of the Lord of Bucklugh by his Majesty's Commandment, wherein you must second Monsieur Caron, with whom the King hath dealt, which is to move the States in his Majesty's Name, That as the English have been and are under one Commander, so the Scottish Nation may be also under another, and the Person appointed thereunto to be the Lord of Bucklugh.
        Concerning the Duke of Cleve his Desire of your assistance to the States, for the freeing of his Country from the Spoils of the States Soldiers: When I consider how partial he hath been in the time of the Admiral of Aragon, although I know the States do rather for necessity then of voluntary Will give Offense, yet I see no great Congruity in your Conjunction therein, neither can it be to any great purpose, saving to satisfy in Formality, reserving your self within the [16/17] Limits of a well wisher in common, in which fort you may, as occasion shall serve, assist his temperate and orderly Remonstrances, being by his Majesty the King as he is:  But for the point of Embden, having acquainted his Majesty with it, he hath taken some time to resolve till he return from Cambridgeshire, which will be within two or three Days, at which time I am appointed to wait upon him at Theobald's, where he will spend four or five Days in Sports, and so come back to this Town:  In the which he meaneth to make his Royal Entry upon the 15th of the next Month, and to begin his Parliament the 19th.  For the matter of your Transportation, it is very true, that the Clauses of your Privy Seal do not bear it, but that shall be no hindrance to you, for I will procure Warrant for it, and then it shall be answered as it is Reason.  And so I do commit you to God.
Your very loving Friend,
Ro. Cecyll


[18] The Lord Cecyll to Mr. Winwood

12th April 1604
Mr. Winwood:
         Although, you do not so often receive my Letters as I do yours, (wherein the cheif Reason is for avoiding unnecessary Charges) yet I do make that use of them which is due to your Diligence, and necessary for his Majesty's Service.  Concerning the Matter of Embden, to tell you true, his Majesty was best disposed to have it passed over without any Answer, being more desirous in this time that you should deny it.  You shall now understand that the Constable of Castile is come to Dunkirk, and resolved presently to take his Passage; so as there is now nothing so certain as a Treaty, and in my opinion, nothing more likely than a Peace.  For as it is most true, that his Majesty's Mind is most inclinable thereunto, and that in Contemplation thereof, things have been so carried here, as if a War were now somewhat unseasonable, so you may see by the King of Spain's great Descent from the heighth of his Formes toward other Princes, (where Punctilios of Precedency have been in Question, and such other Circumstances as are incident to Treaties) as he is determined to go through with it; being now it seems confirmed in the French Position, qui a le profit a l'honeur.  A Matter I confess to you I do clearly foresee he will have, unless the Estate of those poor Countries have some more adjuvances towards their subsisting.
         If you have heard any thing of any Question between the King and the Lower House of Parliament, you may satisfy your self (whatsoever you may hear) that the Cause was only by lack of understanding of what was intended by his Majesty, and not any other Point of Importance.  So as if I did not conceive that idle  Discoursers are apt to make Comments upon all things according to the Levity of their own Braine, I should not have touched it at all; for to be short, it was no more but this.  That Sir Francis Goodwyn having laboured to be Knight of Buckinghamshire, to the Exclusion of an ancient Counsellor Sir John Fortescue, it was advised by the King's learned Councill and Judges, whether there were [18/19] not some Means by the laws to avoid it.  Whereupon it being found that he was outlawed, (and so certifyed by the Sheriff) consequently a new Writ was sent forth, by virtue whereof Sir John Fortescue was chosen.  Notwithstanding, the lower House having had notice that he was once chosen, and having found that the Outlawry was pardoned in Effect, by his Majesty's general Pardon upon his Inauguration, (alto' in true Construction of Law he is not Rectus in Curia, until he hath sued out his Scire Facias,) they somewhat suddenly, fearing some Opposition, (which was never intended) allowed of him, and rejected the other: which form of Proceeding appeared harsh to the King rather in form the Matter.  And, therefore being then desireous that the higher House might have some Conference with the lower House, (which we of ourselves did intimate unto them) they grew jealous of that Proposition, as a Matter which they misliked to yeild to after a Judgment; and therefore did rather choose to send to the King, that they would be glad to shew himself the Reasons, (to whom they owed all Duty as their Soreraign,) rather than to any other, taking it somewhat derogative from their House, to attribute any Superiority to the higher House, seeing both Houses make but one Body, whereof the King is the Head.  This being done, after two Conferences, in the Presence of the King, the Council and Judges, the Matter was compounded to all Men's likings; wherein that which is due, is only due to Caesar; for, but for his Wisdom and Dexterity, it could not have had any Conclusion, with so general an Applause:  This being found by Debate to be most certaine, namely, that neither of them both were duely returned, and therefore resolved of all Parties, that a new Writ should go forth by Warrant from the Speaker, wherein none of them should stand to be elected; and so much for the Truth of that Cause.
        You shall now understand, that in the Case of my Lord of Bucklugh, his Majesty intendeth to declare himself no further.  And therefore, although he favor the Noblemen, and would be glad of any Honor the States should do him, yet he intendeth not in any of these things to press them . . . .
 
                                                Your very loving Friend,

                                                        Ro. Cecyll
 

 From the Court at Whitehall


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